Body Discovered Inside Burning Travel Trailer in Manila | Lost Coast Outpost


Press release from the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office:

On Jan. 8, 2021, at about 7:40 p.m., Humboldt County Sheriff’s deputies were dispatched to the 100 block of Carlson Drive in Manila for a death investigation resulting from a structure fire.

Upon arrival, deputies observed firefighters tending to a travel trailer fire on the property. Deputies learned that while fighting the fire, emergency personnel had located a deceased individual inside the burning trailer.

Due to the condition of the remains, the Humboldt County Coroner’s Office was not able to immediately confirm identification of the deceased.

The cause of the fire is still under investigation. Anyone with information about this case is encouraged to call the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office at (707) 445-7251 or the Sheriff’s Office Crime Tip line at (707) 268-2539.



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Travel baron’s tip on when we’ll be jetting off again


International travel is expected to return within months, as Qantas restarts long-haul flights and pressure builds on the Government to fast-track the rollout of Australia’s COVID-19 vaccine.

Two of Australia’s largest travel organisations this week offered new hope to travel-hungry Australians, with Qantas selling seats to the US and UK from July, and Flight Centre ready to follow.

Australia’s national carrier restarted sales of the international flights despite both countries struggling to bring the virus under control.

“We continue to review and update our international schedule in response to the developing COVID-19 situation,” the airline said.

Brisbane-based Flight Centre CEO Graham “Skroo” Turner

Brisbane-based Flight Centre CEO Graham “Skroo” Turner

 

“Recently we have aligned the selling of our international services to reflect our expectation that international travel will begin to restart from July 2021.”

Flight Centre CEO Graham “Skroo” Turner told The Courier-Mail the Queensland travel giant would closely watch Qantas’ success before deciding whether to restart sales of its own international holiday packages.

Mr Turner said international travel was likely to return from July following Australia’s first COVID-19 vaccinations – which the Government hopes will start in March.

“I think it’s reasonable to accept that vaccinated people will be able to travel reasonably widely by July,” Mr Turner said.

“I would be surprised if a reasonable level of international travel for Australians wasn’t occurring by then.”

Mr Turner, who is locked in hotel quarantine following a business trip to London over Christmas, tipped British residents would be travelling across Europe within months despite the nation being plunged into its third national lockdown this week.

“They’ll be travelling by summer because the vaccine is being rolled out so that’s a positive,” he said.

 

 

Mr Turner expected Australia, which has led the world in managing the virus, would bounce back quickly once the vaccine was widely available.

The pace of the rollout, however, has been criticised by Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese, with more than 2.8 million Americans and 900,000 British people already receiving jabs.

Australia’s Pfizer vaccine is expected to be approved by the Therapeutic Goods Administration this month, however Chief Medical Officer Paul Kelly said further approvals and stock would be secured before widespread inoculation.

Meanwhile, growing clusters in New South Wales and Victoria has again raised concerns about Queensland’s jittery border.

Tourism leaders are calling for the state government to publicly outline clear triggers that will affect border changes instead of relying on confidential advice from the chief health officer.

Queensland Tourism Industry Council CEO Daniel Gschwind said the possibility of snap border closures as interstate clusters grew was “freaking everybody out”.

“Any system that provides greater certainty would certainly be helpful, so we have a bit more predictability on what will happen if a case is identified or a cluster emerges,” he said.

“If we can avoid wholesale border closures, that’s the aim of the game.

“That’s what’s really freaking everybody out and introducing enormous uncertainty into the market and then in consumers’ heads.”

 

Queensland Tourism Industry Council CEO Daniel Gschwind with Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk

Queensland Tourism Industry Council CEO Daniel Gschwind with Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk

 

Mr Turner also revealed Flight Centre lawyers are yet to receive a response to a right to information application seeking the medical advice underpinning Queensland’s border closures earlier this year.

The application, lodged on June 9, sought the documents revealing the heath advice relied on by Chief Health Officer Jeannette Young to justify closing the borders to Sydney and Melbourne between July and December.

Acting Health Minister Mark Furner said the Government would continue to make decisions based on expert health advice.

“It’s because of Queensland’s strong health response and our minimal restrictions that so many Queenslanders are enjoying all that Queensland has to offer over the Christmas-New Year period,” he said.

 

 

 

 

 

Originally published as Travel baron’s tip on when we’ll be jetting off again





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Dr. Pimple Popper’s Sandra Lee’s Maskne Skincare Tip


'Dr. Pimple Popper' Star Sandra Lee Shares Her Super Simple Maskne Tip
Dr. Sandra Lee. Stewart Cook/Shutterstock

Wearing a mask amid the COVID-19 pandemic does a lot of good to prevent the spread of the coronavirus but it can also cause breakouts —a.k.a. maskne. Luckily, Dr. Pimple Popper star Dr. Sandra Lee has the simple solution we’ve all been searching for!

“We all get breakouts from our masks,” she tells Us while talking about the new season of her TLC show. “So I really like to use this little travel size salicylic acid body spray. And what you’ll do is, you just spray the mask.” You just wave it dry and voila! You’ve got yourself an acne-fighting protective face mask.

She notes that beta hydroxy acid in salicylic works to counteract the buildup of oil and debris that collects when wearing a mask.

“Also it’s better when you’re wearing makeup,” she explains, saying that at times it can feel like you’re trapped inside a microclimate created by the mask. “This is a really great thing because salicylic acid is great to settle down within your pores and help to clear out the dirt and the debris and help prevent blackheads and whiteheads forming that lead to acne.”

While talking with Us, the TLC star also revealed one of her most unexpected celebrity fans: Kim Kardashian!

“I wasn’t actually seeing her [as a patient]. She drove over [to my office] to say ‘hello’ to me and she said she was obsessed with [my show],” Lee told Us. “I was like, ‘Oh, my gosh. This is crazy.’”

Other A-list fans include Gwyneth Paltrow, Selena Gomez and Ashley Graham.

“There’s so many people that are [fans]. It’s amazing for me to see,” she explained. “It’s really special, actually, because obviously everybody knows them. And for them to actually recognize or maybe even tell you that — you know, stop and tell you that they really like what you’re doing — I mean, that’s just a crazy action.”

If you too are a “popaholic” you can watch season 5 of Dr. Pimple Popper on TLC every Tuesday at 9 p.m. ET.

Given the constantly evolving nature of COVID-19, Us Weekly wants our readers to have access to the most accurate resources. For the most up-to-date coronavirus information, guidance, and support, consult the CDC, WHO, and information from local public health officials. If you’re experiencing coronavirus symptoms, call your primary care provider for medical advice.

Listen on Spotify to Get Tressed With Us to get the details of every hair love affair in Hollywood, from the hits and misses on the red carpet to your favorite celebrities’ street style ‘dos (and don’ts!)



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Two UK cases of South Africa Covid strain are likely ‘the tip of the iceberg’& restrictions ‘may be too late’


THE two UK cases of the coronavirus strain from South Africa are likely to be the “tip of the iceberg”, according to experts.

And banning flights from South Africa, and strict quarantining of recent arrivals, may be “too late” to stop the spread of the new variant in the UK.

⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates

A new strain which developed in the UK has already plunged millions in Tier 4 rules

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A new strain which developed in the UK has already plunged millions in Tier 4 rulesCredit: AFP or licensors

During yesterday’s Downing Street briefing, the Health Secretary Matt Hancock revealed the new and “highly concerning” strain, called 501.V2, had entered Britain.

He ordered anyone who has visited South Africa in the past two weeks, or been in contact with someone who has, to quarantine immediately.


Coronavirus Scotland: Almost a fifth of Scots planning to break Covid rules to celebrate Christmas, poll shows


All flights from South Africa will be stopped, with people who have been in or transited through South Africa in the last 10 days are no longer allowed into the UK, other than British or Irish nationals who must self isolate.

Mr Hancock claimed the new variant is even more contagious than another new strain detected in Kent and London earlier this month, which scientists say is up to 70 per cent more easily spread.

It has led to millions being plunged into Tier 4 at the “eleventh hour” before Christmas, or on Boxing Day, to manage “out of control” cases.

Professor Lawrence Young, a molecular oncologist, University of Warwick, told The Sun: “If this strain is as transmissible as suggested by the data that has come out of South Africa, then just identifying a few cases recently, it’s probably just the tip of the iceberg, I suspect.

“You can identify it in a couple of people… but they’ll be more, for sure. 

“Some cases will be from people spreading it in the UK, and some will be from other introductions from South Africa.”

Prof Young said there is “still a lot we don’t know” about the variant from South Africa, and whether it is more transmissible, or simply been able to grow “in the right place, at the right time”. 

Scientists in South Africa say the variant is still being analysed, but the data are consistent with it spreading more quickly. It accounts for around 90 per cent of new cases.

Prof Young said: “If this has become the dominant infection in South Africa, and it’s been there certainly for a couple of months, and how many have travelled between the UK and South Africa in that time now? Quite a lot I would’ve thought.”

Paul Hunter, a professor of medicine at the University of East Anglia, said it’s “quite possible” there are undetected cases in the UK, but it will “probably be a number of weeks before we know for certain”.

Speaking of the quarantine measures imposed yesterday, Prof Hunter said: “It might already be too late, but we just don’t know.

“If [these two] are the only infections, yes it might be enough. But if it has already spread elsewhere in the UK and we just don’t know it, the answer is probably no, it won’t be sufficient.”

What is the new strain from South Africa?

The new variant is called 501.V2 and it was announced by the South African government on December 18.

At this stage, its symptoms do not appear to be different to that caused by the original Covid strain.

The most common signs of Covid to look out for are a loss of taste and smell, a persistent cough, and a high temperature.

Scientists are investigating whether the new strain causes more severe disease. But it does seem to be infecting more young people than the original strain, according to South African’s health minister Zweli Mkhize.

Dr Andrew Preston, University of Bath, said: “The ‘South African’ variant is distinct from the UK variant, but both contain an unusually high number of mutations compared to other SARS-CoV-2 lineages.”

“Some of these mutations change the S protein, which is cause for concern,” Dr Preston said.

The spike protein is on the outer surface of the viral particle. It is a focus for coronavirus vaccines, and so if it changes, it could affect how vaccines work.

New strains may make vaccines less effective, because the immune system does not recognise the new variant when it infects the body. This is “highly unlikely” to affect the vaccines that are being rolled out in the UK right now.

The mutations in this virus also mean it’s possible it can reinfect a person who has already recovered from Covid-19.

All of these things are being studied closely.

Mutations are normal in any evolution of a virus over time. Already thousands have been found in SARS-CoV-2 within one year.

What makes the latest two from the UK and South Africa so interesting is the speed at which they became “prominent”, causing lots of cases and suddenly.

The two confirmed cases -in London and the North West – were close contacts of people who had recently travelled to South Africa.

Those travellers would have had Covid-19, possibly without showing symptoms.

It is not clear if this was while they were in the UK, and if they have passed it onto other people who have gone undetected. 

Infectious diseases expert Dr Susan Hopkins told the Downing Street press conference yesterday that health chiefs were “pretty confident” the measures that have been taken will help to control the spread.

TRAVEL ALLOWS STRAINS TO SPREAD

Experts said it’s likely there are more cases of the South Africa variant on the basis that the UK one has already reached several other countries. 

Prof Hunter told The Sun: “It wouldn’t surprise me if it was circulating, in the way the English one is circulating already in many European countries.”

Prof Young said: “This so-called UK variant is now in Belgium, Gibraltar, the Netherlands, Australia, Denmark. It’s all over the place. Today it’s been reported in Israel.

Where the UK strain has been detected

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Where the UK strain has been detected

“It’s because of travelling. I know it is difficult, but if you don’t restrict travel, and you’re not strict about quarantining people, this is what you end up with.”

The UK has repeatedly seen introductions of other strains from across the world which have quickly become dominant, and caused cases to soar. 

Prof Young said: “One of the things we’ve not been so good at is border control. When you look at countries that have been successful, one of the things they did very early on is shut their borders.

“We were very slow to do that, hence we allowed a lot of introductions of the virus into the UK from overseas.

“That’s what happened in the first wave, and it looks like that also contributed to fuelling this second wave.”

What’s happening in South Africa?

501.V2 accounts for up to 90 percent of South Africa’s new cases.

Daily confirmed infections are reaching 9,500 per day, on average.

It’s the highest it’s been since the peak of the first wave in July, when almost 13,000 cases were being diagnosed a day.

The country saw a dip in cases between September and mid-November before a sudden spike, which the health minister Mr Mkhize said was “being driven by this new variant”.

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Latest figures suggest the South African strain was behind a record number of people being hospitalised there.

South Africa has recorded the highest number of coronavirus infections on the African continent, approaching the 950,000 mark, with over 25,000 related deaths so far.

A resurgence in positive cases saw the government tighten lockdown restrictions last week, but a lockdown has not been used.

The World Health Organization (WHO) said on December 18 it was in touch with the South African researchers who identified the new variant.

“We are working with them with our SARS-CoV-2 Virus evolution working group,” said WHO epidemiologist Maria Van Kerkhove.

“They are growing the virus in the country and they’re working with researchers to determine any changes in the behaviour of the virus itself in terms of transmission.”

Boris Johnson refuses to rule out new national lockdown as new Covid-19 strains hit hard


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Artificial Intelligence Wants to Help Covid-Wary Biz Travelers Be Smarter About Flying – Skift


It’s the question most global companies want an answer for: Can they finally restart their travel programs in 2021?

There’s been a lot of progress over the past few months, with several digital health passport schemes launched and vaccines rolling out. Travel corridors also offer some hope, with different countries relaxing rules or establishing fast lanes.

But at the same time, it means employers are faced with overwhelming amounts of information to process.

Now one technology platform thinks it has the answer. Dataminr said it leverages artificial intelligence to provide the earliest indications of business-critical information about risks to staff.

It claims it can provide real-time insights from on-the-ground happenings, such as new international travel restrictions or reports of overcrowded airport terminals through social media, to help inform travel decisions.

Dataminr also said it first detected the outbreak of Covid-19 from public social media posts at 9:11AM EST on December 30, 2019, so provided clients with the earliest warning — in advance of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announcement seven days later, and the World Health Organization’s announcement 10 days later.

In June, travel managers attempted to figure out their return to travel plans, which proved short-lived. Is data crunching the secret to restoring confidence?

Early Warning Signals

“Data is key to decision making as organizations plan their return to travel, as authorizing managers weigh up the competing risks versus business need,” said Daniel Raine, founder of Unlocked Data. “Third-party data sources can provide a useful bridge to support the pre-tip decision making ensuring the travellers are informed and supported throughout their travel experience.”

Organizations and their travel managers need to receive the most relevant and useful information, and arguably this is best performed with algorithms that filter large and multi-dimensional data sets to support the individual trip decision-making.

The idea of real-time decision making also flips around the notion of booking in advance to save money. With more continuous pricing and dynamic fares around the corner, it’s also becoming a much less relevant practice.

“The speed with which circumstances change means that the final travel decision remains fluid right through until departure,” Raine added. The data used to support these decisions must be similarly dynamic and timely.

Meanwhile, the ability to curate the right kinds of information could fit with other off-the-shelf risk services. “This could sit alongside or even compete with what International SOS, Healix, and Riskline provide with their alerts,” said Gavin Smith, director of Element Technology. “I can see this being a useful early warning system that could help a business prepare to take action.”

American Airlines, Allegiant Air and other travel companies use Dataminr, a spokesperson said, in addition to other corporations who use its alerts to assess risk for their employees who travel. Its website counts Citi, 3M, and McDonald’s as clients, while Baylor University in Waco, Texas uses the platform to assess risk for faculty and students who are traveling abroad.

HUman Touch

However, travel decision-making involves more than taking stock of where travel restrictions have been lifted. There’s the personal profile of the traveler and their own circumstances, including health and risk appetite, too.

Dataminr says business face a unique set of new risks and challenges, and the recipients of its alerts vary by organization, depending on how they approach risk management. And some customers choose to provide access to all of their employees, while others restrict access to specific roles within the organization.

Unlocked Data’s Raine argued that although data science can be good at evaluating the objective risk of travel and likelihood of successful outcomes, organisations have rightly steered away from using algorithms to measure the complexity of traveler’s risk profile.

“One of the elephants in the room has to be that no company will ever say something is 100 percent safe,” said Chris Pouney, a former travel manager and associate at GoldSpring Consulting. “Risk managers have long argued that we need to take a more nuanced approach to risk management, considering who is traveling, their demographics and behaviors, as well as where they are going, and who they are seeing. Mitigation can then be developed.”

In the meantime, industry executives across different sectors continue to put their heads together. Travel Again’s Global Travel Recovery Framework is one of the more recent initiatives to offer recommendations on how to rebuild traveler confidence. It brought together executives from companies including Facebook, Hilton, HRS, Southwest Airlines and Air Canada to thrash out a plan.

Employees ultimately have the final say in when they get back on the road, but companies will probably take whatever help they can to make that calculation as easy as possible.

Photo Credit: Organisations have so far tended to steer away from using algorithms to measure the complexity of a traveler’s risk profile. Ismail Mohamed Sovile / Unsplash



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Lady Toppers Travel to Little Rock on Sunday


BOWLING GREEN, Ky. — The WKU women’s basketball team tips off the first of four games in nine days at Little Rock on Sunday. The game is set for a 2 p.m. (CT) tip and will be broadcast on ESPN+.   
 
Game Info
WKU (0-2) at Little Rock (2-2)
Sunday, Dec. 13 | 2 p.m. (CT)
Little Rock, Ark. | Jack Stephens Center
 
Links
WKU Game Notes
Watch (ESPN+)
Listen (ESPNKY 102.7) – Brett Williams (play-by-play)
Live stats
 
Notes

  • The Lady Toppers are currently led in scoring by Meral Abdelgawad who is putting up 14.0 points per game. Abdelgawad also leads on the boards, pulling down 9.5 rebounds per game. Ally Collett is the second leading scorer at 11.0 points per game.
  • Abdelgawad has made her presence felt on the defensive end of the court. She is racking up 8.0 defensive rebounds per game, which is the second highest rate in Conference USA and 25th nationally. Her 3.0 steals a game are also second in C-USA and 39th in the country. Selma Kulo is averaging 2.0 blocks per game, which is the second best rate in the league.
  • Sunday’s matchup will be the 32nd meeting between WKU and Little Rock, with most of the matchups coming during the teams’ shared Sun Belt Conference days. The Lady Toppers hold a 24-7 advantage in the series, including an 11-3 record in Little Rock.
  • Last season, the Lady Toppers and the Trojans faced off in Bowling Green and WKU came away with a 77-58 victory. Raneem Elgedawy led WKU with 22 points and 10 rebounds. Fatou Pouye had 13 points and seven rebounds in the contest and Abdelgawad had eight points.
  • In WKU’s last outing, Abdelgawad notched her second career double-double with 15 points and 10 rebounds along with a career high five steals. Pouye added 12 points and seven rebounds and Myriah Haywood joined the duo in double figures with 11 points, seven rebounds and three assists.

 
How to Follow the Lady Toppers: For complete information on WKU Lady Topper Basketball, visit WKUSports.com or follow the program via social media @LadyTopperHoops on Twitter, @LadyTopperHoops on Instagram and on Facebook at facebook.com/WKUWomensBasketball.
 





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Tulsa Postpones Game with Arkansas


FAYETTEVILLE – The University of Tulsa announced today that a positive COVID-19 test on the Golden Hurricane men’s basketball team and the subsequent quarantining of its student-athletes has forced the postponement of its game with Arkansas.

Tulsa was scheduled to host the Razorbacks on Tuesday, Dec. 8.

No make-up date has been set.

 

For more­­ information on Arkansas Men’s Basketball, follow @RazorbackMBB on Twitter.

 





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This is the tip Jack Nicklaus gave a ‘frustrated’ Gary Player on the range


Welcome to Play Smart, a new game-improvement column that drops every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from Director of Game Improvement content Luke Kerr-Dineen to help you play smarter, better golf.

There’s so much I love about this video (below), not least of which is the image of an 85-year-old Gary Player, with a big bucket of range balls, grinding it out, working hard on improving his golf swing. Deep in our hearts we knew this was the case, but it’s nice to get some proof.

“The grind never stops,” Player wrote.


By:


Luke Kerr-Dineen



But what, exactly, was Player actually grinding on?

Though Player is an aging wonder by even the most discerning standards, he’s still not immune to the physical effects of time. And one of them — the length of his backswing — is one he’s busy trying to stave-off.

When people get older, their bodies naturally become more inflexible. It’s a normal part of the aging process that results from joint stiffness and a lack of water in your body’s tissues. For golfers, that physical limitation manifests itself most apparently in the length of your backswing. It’s evident in Player’s own move; while his flexibility is still remarkable for an 85-year-old, his swing his notably shorter than it was earlier in his career, as you can see below.

A 39-year-old Gary Player on the left, and an 85-year-old Gary Player on the right.

That forced-shorter backswing can be an issue for aging golfers, because a longer backswing is scientifically proven way of boosting your swing speed. Gary knows this, which is why he works so hard on trying to maintain that flexibility. It’s something we first saw Gary working on under the watchful eye of Jack Nicklaus earlier this year at Big Cedar Lodge.

“Why does that happen?” Gary asked his friend, Jack. “Alright, I know I’m a bit older, but why?”

This weekend, Player was back on the range hard at work trying to lengthen his backswing when Nicklaus stopped by once again to help him out.

What was Jack’s advice? In both videos above, Jack tells Gary that his arms and club are, essentially, moving too much inside and around his body. That’s restricting the length his arms can travel on the backswing, Jack says, which is why he tells Gary he could benefit from extending his arms higher, toward the sky. By freeing up his arms, they’ll be able to swing back more, which will help lengthen Player’s backswing and add speed.

As for a stretch to help coach-in this swing feeling: As Jack watches, the person alongside him in his cart puts Player’s left hand on the top of his golf club, and holds it as he stretches his right up and behind him.

Gary does this a few times, then begins ripping drivers again. His swing already looked a little longer, and along the way, he got a nugget of advice we can try the next time we’re on the range.

All of our market picks are independently selected and curated by the editorial team. If you buy a linked product, GOLF.COM may earn a fee. Pricing may vary.

Luke Kerr-Dineen

Golf.com Contributor

Luke Kerr-Dineen is the Director of Game Improvement Content at GOLF Magazine and GOLF.com. In his role he oversees all the brand’s service journalism spanning instruction, equipment, health and fitness, across all of GOLF’s multimedia platforms.

An alumni of the International Junior Golf Academy and the University of South Carolina–Beaufort golf team, where he helped them to No. 1 in the national NAIA rankings, Luke moved to New York in 2012 to pursue his Masters degree in Journalism from Columbia University and in 2017 was named News Media Alliance’s “Rising Star.” His work has also appeared in USA Today, Golf Digest, Newsweek and The Daily Beast.





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Pro tip from the Greenbrier’s interior designer: Embrace color and shun beige


Since taking over Dorothy Draper and Company, Varney has designed and refurbished countless hotels, buildings, homes and even a presidential yacht, the USS Sequoia. However, the Greenbrier occupies a special place in his heart; as the hotel’s official curator, the 83-year-old maintains an office there. His hardcover valentine, “Romance & Rhododendrons: My Love Affair with America’s Resort — The Greenbrier,” comes out Dec. 5. We spoke with Varney in his Palm Beach office, before he traveled to Washington for a meeting with the National Council of the White House Historical Association. (He’s an appointed member.) He planned to spend Thanksgiving at the Greenbrier, where gravy is a condiment, not a palette. Here are his insights into design and the fabled hotel, plus how color (optimistic orange? positive purple?) can lift our spirits during these gloomy-gray times.

The power of color: I have spent 54 years trying to open the windows and doors of America to color. I believe color has a total effect on people’s heads, minds and attitudes. A beautiful sunny room makes people happy. I think children who grow up in rooms that are pretty and colorful and magical are better people.

Colorful bedfellows: The White House has a bright red room and a green room and a blue room and a gold room. When the Jefferson dining room was done at Monticello, it was a bright gold. They finally returned it to that color.

A beige experience: I once went to a hotel on my way back from Bora Bora, and the carpet was a knobby gray, and the walls were beige with white trim, and the curtains were gray-beige. Even the art was beige. I went into the travertine bathroom, and when I came out, I thought I was naked in a bowl of oatmeal.

Before the beige era: When I came to the office in the early ’60s, hotels were not beige and gray. They were colorful. They were pretty. William Pahlmann used to do wonderful hotels. Ellen McCluskey did great hotels. Tom Lee did great hotels. When Mrs. Draper did the Mayflower in Washington, D.C., the rooms were beautiful.

Never change: We’ve never changed. We’ve become interesting and special. People come to us because we do color. Our business is the oldest established decorating and design company in America, and we survived the muted [trend].

The Greenbrier is not . . . the Ritz-Carlton. You can tell what they are. They have the panel walls, the matching sconces, the Aubusson-style rug, the round table in the middle, the flowers on the round table, the winged chairs in light blue in the corner. It’s all uniform.

The Greenbrier is . . . special. If you go to a great house in Europe, you don’t want to see beige. You want see how one generation added onto the [designs of the] next generation, but they didn’t eliminate the previous generation. So the houses are interesting. They’re fun to go into, to see the series of people who have lived there. In the Greenbrier, that beautiful Princess Grace portrait I hung in the north parlor . . . you don’t have to be a pre-Revolutionary-war person to be hung on the wall there. We honor our past as well as we accept the future.

Beyond rooms: We did a new chapel. Then I did a casino and a sports center. There’s always something happening. Gov. [Jim] Justice [the resort’s owner] trusts me, and they don’t interfere with what we do. It’s like my own house.

Just like home: I have been there for so many years, I feel like I know what is in the bottom drawer of Room 1029. That’s the room I always stay in. And, of course, they did a suite several years ago, the Carleton Varney Suite, which is on the north end. It looks over the mountains. There are a lot of people who think it should be a convention hotel. They don’t understand that it’s a country house hotel. I want you to feel as if you are the owner and you invited your friends to stay over. You offer them the yellow bedroom or the pink bedroom or the striped bedroom. But you don’t offer them oatmeal.

The White House of West Virginia: It’s much like the White House in many ways. It has the columns. The emir of Qatar came here, and when the wife arrived, she said to her husband, “I never knew the White House had a golf course.” She thought it looked so much like the White House.

Banana leaf copycats: We did the big banana leaf design for a hotel in Brazil, and then they used it for the Beverly Hills Hotel. It’s our pattern, and everybody is using it. It’s on bed trays, women’s clothes — it’s on everything.

Shades of blue: Mrs. Draper believed that Jefferson painted the ceilings at Monticello that light aqua blue to deflect the insects and mosquitoes. Dorothy was very unhappy when Tiffany came out with those boxes in blue because she said it was her color.

Hues with benefits: I like to be in a green room because I feel like I am in the mountains of Montana or the jungles of St. Croix. I have always painted small rooms dark colors — garnet red, royal blue, sable brown — because they become more intimate. Mrs. Draper never did a ballroom unless it was pink because pink flatters faces. I worked with Dorothy for seven years. I remember working on a hotel in D.C. called the Sutton House. Dorothy would look at the fabric we were working with and say, “Show me nothing that looks like gravy.” Nothing that looked it was going to be on a turkey or a piece of meat. It had to be happy.

Executive decorating: I was Jimmy Carter’s decorator when he was in the White House. The Carters had the most wonderful style — down home. I would do tuzzy muzzies on the tables when [then-U.K. Prime Minister] Margaret Thatcher came to a state dinner. And then I did their cottage and log cabin in Ellijay [Georgia]. I helped them at the Carter Center [in Atlanta]. I redid the house in The Plains. Speaking of Washington, I was also the Quayles’ decorator when they did the Naval Observatory, and it was very colorful. Marilyn [Quayle] didn’t want any roses like Barbara Bush had. I did a china service for the vice president’s house — light blue and gold. I wanted to find out if Tipper Gore [the subsequent resident] ever used it. I got a letter back that it was in the basement.

Book timing: I’m not getting younger. I felt I owed it to the Greenbrier to write this story so that future generations would know about the color and spirit of the place. There is a whole thing called the Greenbrier style, which I hope the world never loses.

Shop Draper: People like to walk out of the Greenbrier with something that looks likes the Greenbrier. We have all these things that we call Dorothy Draper Home. We have pillows, trays and lamps. We opened the store [at the Greenbrier] last July. It is the only one now. We are going to have a couple in other places.

Garden variety: I like the colors that come up in the garden and the colors that come from below the earth — the emeralds and beautiful rubies.

Foreign influence: I love Portugal, and I have a house in Ireland. I live in Ireland half the year. I love the Irish green, the countryside. I planted daffodil and tulip bulbs. I plant a thousand every year, so my fields are all yellow. People who plant a garden believe in a tomorrow.

Insta-Greenbrier: The Greenbrier used to be a Kodak moment, but now it’s an Instagram moment.

Greenbrier is home: I think people like to go back to the Greenbrier because it doesn’t change. They know they’re home.



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5 unique golf courses around the world you can travel to


Malaysia has much to offer golfers. Many courses here often make their way into annual “best of” lists, with enthusiasts commending their high quality green and beautiful driving ranges.

In Kuala Lumpur alone, there are over 40 golf courses available. For some venues, one would need to be invited by a club member or stay at an associated hotel before they can play there.

But while Malaysia is a top golfing destination, it’s also worth travelling abroad to experience other courses. More than just the chance to play at different courses, a “golf holiday” also lets you explore new destinations.

With so many breathtaking courses all over the world, it can be difficult to choose where to go. A tip is to narrow down the location according to your budget, as well as the kind of weather you’d like to play in.

If you’re dreaming of a golf holiday, here are some unique courses around the world to tee off.

Extreme 19th at Legend Golf & Safari Resort, South Africa

The iconic Extreme 19th at Legend Golf & Safari Resort located in Limpopo, South Africa, is famed for its world’s longest and highest Par 3 hole.

Treat yourself to an astonishing view – miles of African savannah stretching as far as the eye can see – when you play here. The tee shot is accessible only by helicopter and is 400m high on Hanglip Mountain.

Look out for the patch of greenery shaped like the African continent at the course.

Apart from being in the middle of a wildlife preserve, the venue is known for its “world-in-one” Signature Course where each of the 18 holes is designed by a different golfing legend.

Camp Bonifas, Between North and South Korea

Dare to play golf in a war zone? Touted as “the most dangerous course on the planet”, the Camp Bonifas course is located in the Korean Demilitarised Zone, which is on the border of North and South Korea.

   Dubbed the ‘most dangerous golf course in the world’, Camp Bonifas is located in the Korean Demilitarised Zone. — EDWARD N. JOHNSON/US ArmyDubbed the ‘most dangerous golf course in the world’, Camp Bonifas is located in the Korean Demilitarised Zone. — EDWARD N. JOHNSON/US Army

This single-hole course sits beside one of the most fortified borders in the world. The green is surrounded on three sides by live minefields!

This Par 3 hole is said to be challenging as the green is hard as a rock.

Uummannaq, Greenland

Hate the heat? Then consider playing on a giant iceberg. Located about 800km north of the Arctic Circle, Uummannaq in Greenland hosts the World Ice Golf Cham-pionships, where people all around the world come to play below freezing temperatures. The rules are pretty much the same as your standard game of golf, except that the holes are a little shorter, the cups are larger, and everything is frozen.

Although seal dens and crevasses are potential hazards, the biggest threat is frostbite, which players are taught how to spot before they tee off.

Himalayan Golf Club, Nepal

Few courses around the world give that “wow factor” like the Himalayan Golf Club. Located 7km away from Pokhara, Nepal, the course is situated in a vast canyon created by melted snow from the Bijayapur river.

Golfers here get a spectacular view of the Fishtail and Annapurna mountain ranges. The venue is home to the only natural river island hole in the world. Don’t be surprised to find wild cattle and buffaloes roaming freely while playing.

Arikikapakapa Rotorua Golf Club, New Zealand

The geographical layout of the Arikikapakapa Rotorua Golf Club is a favourite feature among many golfers across the globe.

   The Rotorua Golf Club was built around the Arikikapakapa reserve in Whakarewarewa, an active geothermal area in New Zealand. — Rotorua Golf Club websiteThe Rotorua Golf Club was built around the Arikikapakapa reserve in Whakarewarewa, an active geothermal area in New Zealand. — Rotorua Golf Club website

This unique 18-hole thermal golf course is located in the middle of a sulfur and brimstone thermal zone.

There are hot geothermal lakes, bubbling thermal mud pools, creeks with warm water running through and a geyser erupting every so often in the distance, making a golf game here a truly incomparable experience.





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